Human After All
Brendon | 20 | ♂ | PR | Biology Student

"I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it."
Edgar Allan Poe
"The one thing the world will never have enough of is the outrageous."
Salvador Dali
Background: cartoongraveyard


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wassup-holmes:

thunderboltsortofapenny:

starkactual:

Can we talk about Steve here? The way he’s looking at the Tesseract. He must be thinking “how could something this small cause so much pain?” The war it started, the years it cost him… the friends he lost…

can I just-

this is the only closure Steve gets for the war. That the weapon that fueled Schmidt’s maniacal search for power beyond what the Reich could give him, the weapon that created the backbone of Hydra’s weaponry, the weapon that contributed to Bucky’s fall, to the bombs on the plane, to Steve’s decision to down the plane {ten days} and then everything he lost because of that-

this is the only closure Steve gets for losing everything.

Look at him.  Steve Rogers is not the kind of guy who experiences hatred, but he fucking hates that thing.

1 day ago on July 28th, 2014 | J | 9,967 notes
151,033 plays

supamuthafuckinvillain:

This makes me extremely content.

1 day ago on July 28th, 2014 | J | 32,469 notes

unimpressedcats:

me

1 day ago on July 28th, 2014 | J | 124,496 notes
1 day ago on July 28th, 2014 | J | 5,679 notes
1 day ago on July 27th, 2014 | J | 392,788 notes

theoneogorbae:

bookoisseur:

wanderingweasleys:

shardwick:

Fun at Weasley’s Wizard Wheezes.

#ActualSiblings

The look on her face.

"I have been dealing with this for 10 years. You don’t even know."

#ActualWeasleys

1 day ago on July 27th, 2014 | J | 112,137 notes

oscarwildesbigadventure:

We had an intense game of fetch today.
He was huffing and puffing and I had to take a photo!

1 day ago on July 27th, 2014 | J | 212,344 notes
shiroisnotdead:

out of context this makes no sense at all

shiroisnotdead:

out of context this makes no sense at all

1 day ago on July 27th, 2014 | J | 2,990 notes

algebraicat:

if u don’t think music is important u need to remember that 13 dwarves convinced bilbo baggins to rob a dragon just by singing about it

1 day ago on July 27th, 2014 | J | 60,354 notes
1,396,003 plays

akitooo:

coooooooooooooulson:

videohall:

Fastest way to get through a border patrol checkpoint

are you fuckingkidding me

hahahahalmao

1 day ago on July 27th, 2014 | J | 193,005 notes

iraffiruse:

How puppies help when you’re sick.

1 day ago on July 27th, 2014 | J | 348,761 notes
childoflightningg:

everything about this screenshot is so in character

childoflightningg:

everything about this screenshot is so in character

1 day ago on July 27th, 2014 | J | 75,670 notes
goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.
Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.
"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.
"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.
Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.
Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.
One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.
Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.
Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.

Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.

"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "

In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.

"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.

Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.

Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.

One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.

Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.

Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

1 day ago on July 27th, 2014 | J | 2,905 notes
1 day ago on July 27th, 2014 | J | 4,474 notes
rorschachx:

Kirkjufell, Iceland | image by Thorsten Scheuermann

rorschachx:

Kirkjufell, Iceland | image by Thorsten Scheuermann

1 day ago on July 27th, 2014 | J | 255 notes